Waiver in hand, Florida State quarterback Jordan Travis ‘ready to go’

The Louisville transfer quarterback will be eligible to play in 2019.
Florida State redshirt freshman quarterback Jordan Travis (13), who played at Louisville last season, will be eligible to play in 2019. (OCTAVIO JONES | Times)
Florida State redshirt freshman quarterback Jordan Travis (13), who played at Louisville last season, will be eligible to play in 2019. (OCTAVIO JONES | Times)
Published August 13
Updated August 13

BRADENTON ― Speaking publicly for the first time since being granted a hardship waiver, FSU redshirt freshman quarterback Jordan Travis called his four-month stay in NCAA limbo “very stressful.”

The school announced Monday the waiver for Travis, a Louisville transfer and West Palm Beach native, had been approved, allowing him to play for the ’Noles this season. FSU applied for his waiver last spring.

“This was very tough for me, it was stressful,” said Travis, who grew up revering Jameis Winston and the ’Noles. “But I’m ready to go now and get rolling.”

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After departing Louisville, where he reportedly was subject to verbal abuse by at least one member of UL’s former staff, Travis said he also considered FAU, UCF and USF.

“It was my dream school since a little boy, so it wasn’t that tough,” Travis said. “But Coach (Kendal) Briles (FSU’s offensive coordinator) and Coach (Willie) Taggart welcomed me, and I just felt very comfortable here.”

Travis, who totaled more than 3,000 yards and 40 touchdowns as a senior at Palm Beach Benjamin in 2017, gives FSU some sorely-needed quarterback depth. Incumbent James Blackman is widely believed to remain atop the depth chart, but Wisconsin transfer Alex Hornibrook also is competing.

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“I thought Jordan handled (the wait) well,” said Taggart, whose team is practicing at IMG Academy through Thursday.

“He went about his business in practice as if he was gonna play, and I think he handled it well. I know for me personally, I didn’t see him as being discouraged or anything. He was just basically waiting and putting all his trust in our compliance department and had faith in the NCAA to do the right thing, and it worked out.”

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