Linklist test

Mo’ lists fo’ twists
Seton Hall's Desiree Elmore attempts to block shot from Sacred Heart's Jessica Woods during an NCAA basketball game, Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2019, in South Orange, N.J. Seton Hall won 99-69. (AP Photo/Vera Nieuwenhuis)
Seton Hall's Desiree Elmore attempts to block shot from Sacred Heart's Jessica Woods during an NCAA basketball game, Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2019, in South Orange, N.J. Seton Hall won 99-69. (AP Photo/Vera Nieuwenhuis)
Published November 15
Updated November 15

Here’s a paragraph.

Deploying your Feature Pack to Fusion is simple in concept: you'll create a .zip file that contains all the code in your Feature Pack, and then you'll upload that to Maestro. Maestro will handle the process of building your code and deploying it to the various services that work together to make Fusion run. We'll call an instance of a deployed Feature Pack a "bundle".

One of the capabilities of Fusion’s architecture is the ability to have multiple different deployed bundles running simultaneously, while only one of them is “live” (i.e. the one users can see). This has several benefits, most notably the ability to “hot swap” from one running bundle to another without users experiencing any downtime. You can even preview a running bundle before it goes “live” so that you can test your code on a running server before users see it.

Linklist test follows.

Deploying your Feature Pack to Fusion is simple in concept: you’ll create a .zip file that contains all the code in your Feature Pack, and then you’ll upload that to Maestro. Maestro will handle the process of building your code and deploying it to the various services that work together to make Fusion run. We’ll call an instance of a deployed Feature Pack a “bundle”.

Deploying your Feature Pack to Fusion is simple in concept: you’ll create a .zip file that contains all the code in your Feature Pack, and then you’ll upload that to Maestro. Maestro will handle the process of building your code and deploying it to the various services that work together to make Fusion run. We’ll call an instance of a deployed Feature Pack a “bundle”.

Deploying your Feature Pack to Fusion is simple in concept: you’ll create a .zip file that contains all the code in your Feature Pack, and then you’ll upload that to Maestro. Maestro will handle the process of building your code and deploying it to the various services that work together to make Fusion run. We’ll call an instance of a deployed Feature Pack a “bundle”.

One of the capabilities of Fusion’s architecture is the ability to have multiple different deployed bundles running simultaneously, while only one of them is “live” (i.e. the one users can see). This has several benefits, most notably the ability to “hot swap” from one running bundle to another without users experiencing any downtime. You can even preview a running bundle before it goes “live” so that you can test your code on a running server before users see it.

Deploying your Feature Pack to Fusion is simple in concept: you’ll create a .zip file that contains all the code in your Feature Pack, and then you’ll upload that to Maestro. Maestro will handle the process of building your code and deploying it to the various services that work together to make Fusion run. We’ll call an instance of a deployed Feature Pack a “bundle”.

[ New Bucs cornerback Mark Myers went from college startup to the NFL ]

Deploying your Feature Pack to Fusion is simple in concept: you'll create a .zip file that contains all the code in your Feature Pack, and then you'll upload that to Maestro. Maestro will handle the process of building your code and deploying it to the various services that work together to make Fusion run. We'll call an instance of a deployed Feature Pack a "bundle".

Stefanos Tsitsipas
Stefanos Tsitsipas

One of the capabilities of Fusion’s architecture is the ability to have multiple different deployed bundles running simultaneously, while only one of them is “live” (i.e. the one users can see). This has several benefits, most notably the ability to “hot swap” from one running bundle to another without users experiencing any downtime. You can even preview a running bundle before it goes “live” so that you can test your code on a running server before users see it.

Deploying your Feature Pack to Fusion is simple in concept: you’ll create a .zip file that contains all the code in your Feature Pack, and then you’ll upload that to Maestro. Maestro will handle the process of building your code and deploying it to the various services that work together to make Fusion run. We’ll call an instance of a deployed Feature Pack a “bundle”.

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